The truth is…

Show me the Moon

The words in all my stories are more like paintings in my head,
and my pen is struggling to place them perfectly on the white canvas of the blank page,
so I give it a try often asking myself, how can I better show and not simply tell?

Is my heart the instrument needed to give justice to it all?
or should I just surrender and string those words together, forgetting all about the paintings I envision?

I guess it is always going to be a challenge when words and images often mingle so tightly together in my heart

28 comments on “The truth is…

  1. Write, photograph and meld where you can. Sometimes the words will speak louder and at others the photographs. Today both the image and the words could stand alone. Together it is a slightly different result – and all three have power. I hope that made sense. It did in my head but..

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  2. I say put it down, and then play with it. And write, write, write. Like how do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice. How do we finish a novel or book? Practice. And just like a painter mixes and starts over and starts over again, so as writers, we craft and think and change and work until just the right word fits in.

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  3. I say “let go” – simple do. Don’t think or over think. Let your heart flow, let the words go — whatever they are. Get them onto the paper. Then go back and look again and see if you want to make changes. Sometimes our brains take far too much control and want far too much of the credit. That’s ego stepping in. Let go of the ego (and I don’t mean that in a negative sense as in your ego is too big…it’s what we all have and what we all work to keep to a minimum) and see where that takes you. xo

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  4. A painter steps back, and squints, then moves forward once more to add another hint of colour to a canvas. Words are rarely placed perfectly on the white canvas of the blank page. Layers after layers are applied, some covering earlier layers. Until the pentimento of myriad layers of words finally shines through for the reader to ‘see’ what the writer has been squinting at.
    They call it ‘revision’ because we look at our work, over and over, many times, aiming to get it perfect.
    ej

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